Joint Physical Custody is in the best interests of children

Joint Physical Custody is in the best interests of children.
Joint Physical Custody is in the best interests of children.

The growing consensus that Joint Physical Custody is in the best interests of children is the topic of this blog post.

A recent article in the July/August 2018 issue of Nebraska Lawyer Magazine written by Linda L. Nielsen, Ph.D discusses the consensus that Joint Physical Custody is in the best interests of children.

Linda Nielsen is a Professor of Adolescent and Educational Psychology at Wake Forest University in Winston Salem, NC. She is an internationally recognized expert on shared physical custody research and father-daughter relationships. In addition to her seminars for family court and mental health professionals, she is frequently interviewed on the topic of shared parenting by journalists, including Time magazine and the Wall Street Journal.

The article is several pages long but the conclusion of the article is that “These 60 studies reflect the consensus of an international group of 110 scholars and mental health practitioners and a group of 12 renowned researchers: JPC is in children’s best interest, absent situations such as substance abuse or violence, which pose a danger to children even when their parents are still together.”

The article states in relevant part that,

“JPC is generally linked to better outcomes than SPC for children, independent of parental conflict, family income, or the quality of children’s relationships with their parents. Parents do not need to have a low conflict, communicative coparenting relationship or mutually agree to JPC at the outset in order for children to benefit from JPC. Nor is there reliable evidence that children under the age of four are harmed by or do not benefit from JPC or frequent overnighting. These 60 studies reflect the consensus of an international group of 110 scholars and mental health practitioners and a group of 12 renowned researchers: JPC is in children’s best interest, absent situations such as substance abuse or violence, which pose a danger to children even when their parents are still together.”  Nielsen, L. (2018) The Nebraska Lawyer July/August 2018 issue 39, 44 (citing Braver, S. & Lamb, M. (2018). Shared parenting after parental separation: The views of 12 experts. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 59, 372-387. [Special issue on shared parenting];  Warshak, R. (2014). Social science and parenting plans for young children Psychology, Public Policy and Law, 20, 46-67.

The entire article can be viewed or downloaded in PDF at this link:

https://www.nebar.com/resource/resmgr/nebraskalawyer_2017plus/2018/julyaugust/TNL-0718h.pdf

 

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The author of this blog post, Stan Burman, is an entrepreneur and retired litigation paralegal that worked in California and Federal litigation from January 1995 through September 2017 and has created over 300 sample legal documents for sale. He believes in Father’s Rights as he has seen first-hand the incredible bias against fathers in the family law courts in California. He is currently working on creating digital products that will assist fathers both in California and throughout the United States to represent themselves without an attorney in Court regarding custody and support issues.

Follow Fathers rights on Twitter at:

https://twitter.com/Fathersrights16

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DISCLAIMER:

Please note that the author of this blog post, Stan Burman is NOT an attorney and as such is unable to provide any specific legal advice. The author is NOT engaged in providing any legal, financial, or other professional services, and any information contained in this blog post is NOT intended to constitute legal advice.

The materials and information contained in this blog post have been prepared by Stan Burman for informational purposes only and are not legal advice. Transmission of the information contained in this blog post is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, any business relationship between the author and any readers. Readers should not act upon this information without seeking professional counsel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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